The Beacon
1962
Prize List for 1961
Academic Prizes
Dr R Macdonald Prize for 1st in class 2H:      Lorraine McPherson
Star Motel Prize for 2nd in class 2H:               Cecily Smallwood
Cox Bros Prize for 3rd in class 2H:                  Brian Burnett
Dr F C Yarad Prize for 1st in class 2G:           Merle Herring
J Wheaton Prize for 2nd in class 2G:               Marilyn Alaban
Cox Bros Prize for 3rd in class 2G:                  Kaye Mulligan
Star Motel Prize for 1st in class 2F:                Kerrie Gillard
Cox Bros Prize for 2nd in class 2F:                  Sandra Waples
Cox Bros Prize for 3rd in class 2F:                  Roy Hoffmeier
A C Hogbin Prize for 1st in class 2E:              Anita Spagnola
AE Hacking Prize for 2nd in class 2E:             Daphne Beelitz
F W Small Prize for 3rd in class 2E:                Margaret Murray
N Bale Prize for 1st in class 2D:                      Richard O’Toole
S Haworth Prize for 2nd in class 2D:               Beth Hunter
E Thompson Prize for 3rd in class 2D: Patricia Turk
GW & RA Loader Prize for 1st in class 2C:   Delma Walters
Dr F C Yarad Prize for 2nd in class 2C:         Cristine Wheaton
GW & RA Loader Prize for 3rd in class 2C:   Jill Hoschke & Robyn King
J Turner Prize for 1st in class 2B:                    Dawn Eckford
M Smith Prize for 2nd in class 2B:                   Jan Ross
M Smith Prize for 3rd in class 2B:                   Beverley O’Neill
Apex Prize for Dux of 2nd Year:                     James Holmes
GDT. Seccombe & Forsyth Prize for 2nd in class 2A: Gail Quin
Pacific Plywood Prize for 3rd in class 2A:                              John Samio
Special Prizes
Academic and for Proficiency
P & C Prize for Best Leaving Certificate Pass, 1960:            Bronwyn Phillips
JH Brown Prize for English Language & Literature: Helen Corben
Dr Hawke Prize for:
  1. Senior French, Jeanette Whitney
  2. Junior French, John Curran
JC Prize for Progress in Effective Speaking:  Barry O’Brien (4th Year)
Sawtell RSL Women’s Auxiliary Prize for Progress:
            Senior Girl, Adele Toms;  Senior Boy, John Landale
            Junior Girl, Margaret Murray (2E);  Junior Boy, Graham Knight (1B)
CWA Prize for Home Economics:      Shirley Neal (3B)
Cadet Prize for Proficiency & Leadership:     Dennis Lee
Coffs Harbour District Council of the BGF Prize for Agriculture:
            Theoretical Agriculture, Robert Howard (3C), Ray Gale (3F), Robert Griffin (2C),
            Bruce Young (2H), Brian Sisson (2G), John Glyde (1C), David Scully (1C)
            Practical Agriculture, Robert Wallis (3F), Wayne W Smith (2C), Robert McKay (2H),
            Alan Turnbull (2G), Peter Rovere (1C), Orlando Del Pozzo (1E), Ian Lambert (1F)
JC Debating Shield for inter-house competition:  Won by Red House
Presented to Diane Loader, a member of winning senior team
 
House Officials, 1962
Girls
White House:  Lynn Robinson (capt), Heather Watt (secretary)
Green House:  Annette Johnson (capt), Kay Fisher (secretary)
Red House:                 Dianne Loade (capt), Margaret Morrow (secretary)
Blue House:                Heather Eckford (capt), Maureen Aldridge (secretary)
Boys
White House:              Douglas Sykes (capt), Warwick Smith (vice-capt)
Green House:              Richard Hancock (capt), Barry Foster (vice-capt)
Red House:                 Denis Lee (capt), David Llewellyn (vice-capt)
Blue House:                Hugh Crawford (capt), Graham Carter (vice-capt)
Sports Awards, 1962
Sportswoman of the Year:      Delma Walters
Sportsman of the Year:           Barry Foster
Blue Award
Awarded for outstanding ability, sportsmanship, leadership & co-operation
Girls                Hockey:           K Fisher
                        Athletics:         D Walters, R Schumacher
Boys                Cricket:           K Sparks, D Lyall
                        Football:          D Llewellyn, G Williams, G Carter, B Foster, T McNally
                        Athletics:         B Foster, A Young, G Williams
                        Basketball:      G Williams, D Llewellyn
Sports Award of Merit
This award is presented to those who just fail to reach the very high standard demanded of a Blue winner
Girls                Basketball:      F Robinson, J Grey
                        Softball:          K Fisher, D Walters, J Oxford
                        Swimming:      J Hoschke, H Watt
Boys                Cricket:           R Haworth
                        Football:          A Hope, K Sparks, M Nolan, R Barber
                        Tennis:             J Williams, C Ford
                        Athletics:         H Crawford
                        Basketball:      A Young, B Foster, D Sykes, L Pigani
                        Swimming:      D Sykes
Athletic Champions
Senior:             B Foster, R Schumacher
Intermediate:   C McInnes, E Bagnara, G Dean
Junior:             D Johnston, L Rovere
Juvenile:          J Smith, C Waite, S Shipman
Swimming Champions         
Senior:             D Sykes, H Watt
Intermediate:   J Jones, J Hoschke
Junior:             W Browning, G Cleaver
Juvenile:          M Glynn, C Turner
 
Literary Section – 1962
Ode to Shakespeare
Oh’ Shakespeare, why, as your flowery words,
Thou didst pen upon the page.
Didst thou not spare a thought to me,
In this far distant age.
Didst thou n’er once think, of the pain and woe,
Of my miseries beset,
E’re I ventured from your plays and verse,
Some meaning for to get.
And didst thou think long aft’ the grave
Had closed upon your head.
That we would keep each word that thou,
Had penned or jesting said.
For me dost think that in this day,
Of learning, alas, alack.
The thoughts that I read in your words,
Are mine, not thine in fact.
                                                P Freeman, 3A
 
 
The Beacon 1963
Prize List – Third Year
3G          Dr Dolman prize, 1st in 3G:                            Merle Herring.
                Mr and Mrs Fred Reid prize, 2nd in 3G:    Sally Jones.
                L Judd prize, 3rd in 3G:                                    Marilyn Alaban.
3F           M Smith prize, 1st in 3F:                                 Fred Skinner.
                Pacific Plywood prize, 2nd in 3F:                  Roy Hofmeier.
                BL Miller prize, 3rd in 3F:                                                Brian Stephenson, Norina Spagnola.
3E           SE Nelson prize, 1st in 3E:                              Esther Trustum.
                J Corney prize, 2nd in 3E:                                                Gilbert Stokes.
                SE Nelson prize, 3rd in 3E:                              Anita Spagnola.
3D           Pacific Plywood prize, 1st in 3D:                  Patricia Turk.
                A Gilchrist prize, 2nd in 3D:                            Beth Hunter.
                L Judd prize, 3rd in 3D:                                    Fay Philp.
3C           D Appleton prize, 1st in 3C:                           Christine Wheaton.
                L Kesterton prize, 2nd in 3C:                          Robyn King.
                Pier Hotel prize, 3rd in 3C:                             Delma Walters.
3B           A Smith and Son prize, 1st in 3B:                 Gregory Ferris.
                Star Motel prize, 2nd in 3B:                            Larry Griffin.
                A Smith and Son prize, 3rd in 3B:                                Ian Shepherd.
3A           Rotary prize, dux of 3rd year:                       Merita Quin.
                WH Bailey prize, 2nd in 3A:                            James Holmes.
                RG Riddel prize, 3rd in 3A:                             Joyce Wear.
House Officials, 1963
Girls                     
White House:    Heather Watt (captain), Delma Walters (vice-captain).
Green House:    Julia Featherstone (captain), Jill Hoschke (vice-captain).
Red House:         Hilary Nicholson (captain), Margaret Morrow (vice-captain).
Blue House:        Maureen Aldridge (captain), Maree Cutcher (vice-captain).
Boys
White House:    Douglas Sykes (captain), Keith Sparks (vice-captain).
Green House:    Barry Foster (captain), Andrew Hogendyk (vice-captain).
Red House:         Peter Moller (captain), Carl McPhee (vice-captain).
Blue House:        Graham Carter (captain), Robert Cowin (vice-captain).
Sports Awards, 1963
Sportswoman of the Year:           Delma Walters.
Sportman of the Year:                   Douglas Sykes.
Blue Awards
Awarded for outstanding ability, sportsmanship, leadership and co-operation.
Girls
Swimming:          J Hoschke.
Hockey:                                J Feathersone, L Robinson.
Softball:               J Hoschke.
Basketball:          V Lucas.
Boys
Cricket:                 K Sparks.
Football:              B Foster, G Carter, K Sparks, R Cowin.
Athletics:             D Sykes.
Basketball:          L Lee, B Foster.
Swimming:          D Sykes.
Sports Awards of Merit
This award is presented to those who just fail to reach the very high standard demanded of a Blue winner.
Girls
Basketball:          M Morrow, D Walters.
Softball:               S Neal.
Tennis:                 M Aldrige, K Wear, S Neal.
Hockey:                                S Thompson, H Nicholson.
Boys
Cricket:                 R Cowin.
Football:              I Donaldson, D Johnstone, J Martin.
Tennis:                 R Gawne.
Athletics:             B Foster.
Basketball:          D Sykes, L Pigani.
LITERARY SECTION
 
How To Succeed In Rugby League Without Really Trying
   From my past observations, I have found that the easiest position to play in Rugby League is fullback.  On reading this you will probably wonder why more people do not play fullback.  However, there is one regulation – fullbacks must be good looking.  It’s no use protesting, you cannot be a fullback unless you rate sighs from at least three girls.  The most glamorous boys in the business play fullbacks – Les Johns, Ken Thornett, Frank Drake and Graeme Langlands, to name just a few.
   Since fullback is one of the most important defence positions you must not play in a team which is always on defence.  Pick one of the best teams which is usually on the attack so that you will not have to defend continually.
   Now that you are ready to play you must decide what type of fullback you will be.  There are two types, attacking or goal-kicking.
   If you have no hope at all of every kicking a goal it will be best if you become an attacking fullback.  This consists of standing back quietly while your team is on the attack, clearing its way to the try line.  When the way is clear, with everyone too exhausted to take the ball and score you step up, take the ball, and casually saunter over the try line.  After doing this a few times, you will convince the team that you are indispensible and you will be right for the remainder of your Rugby League career.
   On the other hand, if you are convinced that you are a respectable goal kicker you can become a goal-kicking fullback.  This consists of remaining down your end of the field except when converting tries or kicking penalty goals (it is advisable to take your favourite periodical onto the field as play tends to become boring at times).  If you kick well enough you will become a necessary member of the team, assured of selection in future matches.
   No matter how carefully he withdraws himself from the main battle, every fullback faces a crisis at some stage in his career.  Despite the strength of your team, it will eventually meet a team which manages to penetrate the defence, leaving you the sole defender of your team’s line.  This is the moment of truth for every fullback.  You can stop the player with a bone-shattering tackle, or miss, damaging forever your so carefully built up reputation of indispensability.
   If you manage to achieve the first alternative you will, of course, receive immediate and vociferous acclaim, which will be very pleasant no doubt at the time.  But – and here’s the rub – you will have created a very dangerous precedent.  People will expect you to pull off the same sort of thing again, and again, and again, which will not only be extremely exhausting (not to say down-right dangerous), but will inevitably lead to your taking over the team’s defence almost entirely.  This, of course, is not to be thought of – no player plays football for the love of hard work.
   The second alternative, missing the player entirely, is much to be preferred.  This can be achieved – if approached in the right spirit – with very little loss of prestige.  One way is to start a fierce altercation with the nearest player, or preferably the referee, as soon as you spot the attacker bearing down upon you.  If your acting is good enough the public will easily be convinced that your grievance was serious enough for a temporary suspension of play, even at a critical moment in the game.
   Alternatively, you could rush towards the attacker and fling yourself headlong at his legs in a classical tackle, making quite sure that you miss your target by narrow but safe margin.  You will a least receive commiseration for a valiant, even though vain, bid and perhaps even admiration for your stylish play.
   Again, you can start forward with every evidence of a do-or-die resolve, suddenly to pull up lame, or even to crumple in a dead faint.  This last method, if done effectively, always gains the sympathy of even the most partisan crowd, and your reputation will be safe – till the next time.
                                                                Merita Quin, 4A
To My Golf Ball
I sit up, I take a swing, and look up to the sky,
But do I see it sailing down?  No, even though I try.
It’s lying quietly in that bush, not far away from me.
Now how to hit it to the hole.  I really cannot see.
So once more I line it up, determined that this time
I’ll hit it straight.  It will not err from my decided line.
Ker-smash?  It  sounded rather good, now where did that thing go?
Why, there it is, still lying there, right beside my toe.
This time, I murmured to myself, I’ll it there in one.
But where’d it go – I cannot see – I’m blinded by the sun.
Oh!  There it is, just in the drain, there’s one thing I must sy,
I’ll never lose that ball because it’s never far away.
                                                Beverley Amos, 4A
 
 
 
The Beacon
1964
Fourth Year
P & C prize, Dux of Fourth Year:                    Merita Quin
Dr CH Wood prize, second Fourth Year:                     James Holmes
Cox Bros price, third Fourth Year:                   John Samio
H Bailey prize, fourth Fourth Year:                 Douglas Turner
GDT Seccombe prize, fifth Fourth Year:                     Brett Griffin
Special Prizes
P & C prize, best LC Pass, 1962:         Susan Walker
JH Brown, MLA prize, English language & literature: Terrance Hancock
W Weiley, MLA prize, Science (junior) Peter Slack
Dr David Hawke Memorial prize, French:       Senior, Margaret Morrow, Julia Featherstone;  Peter Walker
CWA prize, home economics:             Ella Gabauer
Cadet prize, proficiency & leadership:            Richard O’Toole
Sawtell RSL Sub-Branch Women’s Auxiliary prize, progress: Senior girl, Lyndall Ashdown; senior boy, Geoffrey Herdegen;  junior girl, Janice Hardaker;  junior boy, Paul Bamford
JC Prize, debating & public speaking:  Martin McFaalane
Coffs Harbour District Council BGF Prizes for Agriculture
Fifth Year:  John Ellem:  Fourth Year:  Ronald Gray;  Third Year:  Peter Rovere, Richard Buckton;  Second Year:  Peter McKenzie, Stuart Rowlands, Denis McLaren, Neville McKay
Conti School Supplies prize, technical drawing:  Leonard Skinner
House Captains – Vice-Captains, 1964
Girls
Blue House:                 Captain, L Dornan, 4D;  vice-captain, P Fisher 4A
Green House:               Captain, E Gabauer, 4th;  vice-captain, D Gawne, 5th
Red House:                  Captain, J Ross, B Ovens, 5th;  vice-captain, B Noyce, 5th
White House:               Captain, D Walters, 4C;  vice-captain, J Ross,5th
Boys
Blue:    Captain, R Cowan, 5B;  vice-catpain, T Brown, 4D
Green:  Captain, G Gerlach, 5A;  vice-captain, D Hammond, 5B
Red:     Captain, P Moller, 5C;  vice-captain, C McPhee, 5A
White:  Captain, D Sykes, 5C;  vice-captain, J Rose, 5B
Awards of Merit
Awarded to those who just fail to attain the very high standard demanded of a Blue winner.
Girls
Tennis:                         D Tom, J Wear
Softball:                       L Dornan, D Walters, L Rovere, P Fisher, D Amos
Basketball:                   B Ovens, M Finch, J Ross, C Wheaton
Athletics:                     L Durie, S Shipman, C Walters, J Lamberth
Hockey:                       P Fisher, L Rovere, S Grimmond, S Robinson
Boys
Tennis:                         M McDonald, P Young, J Muldoon
Football:                      J Rose, L Griffin, P Reeves, I Rogers, R Cowin, D Johnston
Basketball:                   P Ireland, C Gill, G Gerlach
Cricket:                                    J Rose, R Cowin, J Muldoon
Athletics:                     C Knight, J Hill, J Ide, J Rose, P McDonald, D Turner, J Haines
Sports Awards, 1964
Sportswoman of the Year:       Delma Walters, 4C
Sportsman of the Year:                        John Rose, 5B
Blue Awards
Awarded for outstanding ability, sportsmanship, leadership and co-operation
Girls
Softball:                       J Ross
Basketball:                   D Walters, L Durie
Athletics:                     D Walters
Boys
Athletics:                     D Sykes
Tennis:                         R Gawne
Athletic Champions
Senior:                         D Walters, D Sykes
Intermediate:                S Shipman, C Knight
Junior:                         L Durie, J Hill
Juvenile:                      C Walters, J Ide
 
Literary Section
Shipwreck
(Allusion to Rime of Ancient Mariner)
The east wind shrilled as the sea-foam flew
And whistled round the crags;
And the salt spray sang and the caverns clanged,
And the ebbing water flagged
From our stately galleon tossed about
On the grey and rolling sea;
We could hear the roar on the rock-strewn shore
As the waves crashed mightily
 
The sea was rough and the surge rose high,
The wind blew fierce and strong;
A powerful blast caught the rails at last,
And the ship was hurled along
 
As wild winds whipped on the white-whirled surf
Swifter the good ship sped;
And the salt spray lashed and the huge waves crashed
On the bare black rocks ahead
 
Through the seething foam and stinging brine
Our ship did reckless plough;
Till the sudden shock of a sunken rock
Split its hull from stem to bow
 
The ship sat locked on the jagged rock
As we cut the life-boats free,
And ‘mid the frenzied din we all leaped in
And pushed them out to sea
 
We made for shore in our bobbing boats
And beached them finally,
But our ship, snatched up in deathlike clutch,
Was claimed by the cruel sea.
Wayne Buckman, 5A
Winter
            Winter had left an icy carpet over the city.  The snow, which had fallen like a soft, white powder, covered the streets in a silvery mantle.  Sparkling white particles of frozen frost clung to the windows and roofs of the houses;  and in the parks, the branches of the stark, windblown trees wore a delicate tracery of glistening snow.
Wayne Buckman, 5A
Slum Land
            Past the expressways striding across the city on their giant legs of concrete;  beyond the towering skyscrapers which dominate the evening skyline;  and behind the sparkling facade of neon signs that light up the downtown area, lies a tangle of narrow. twisting lanes and shabby streets.  Houses, shops and factories huddle together in a grimy confusion of chipped and crumbling brickwork.  Yes!  This is a slum land;  an area whose dirty, sooty and dilapidated buildings present the same grim picture of neglect and decay.  This is a district where the same dwellings have remained unchanged for generations, and where the traditional sluggishness of the inhabitants has built up a barrier that has stood unyielding to resist the winds of change.
Wayne Buckman, 5A
The Teacher
Teacher, teacher, spitting fumes
Within the walls that form our rooms,
What immortal hand or eye
Did frame thy hidden history.
 
Though I try to do my work,
And my duties not to shirk,
What reward do I receive?
What shims of yours must I Perceive?
 
Could you not a kind work spare
To say just once my work is fair;
From your fury turn a while,
Reveal instead a friendly smile.
 
In what college, in what art
Did you exchange a stone for heart?
Where the patience, hear my plea
Did he who make the lamb, make thee?
Bev Amos
With apologies to William Blake
             
 
 
The Beacon
1962
Prize List for 1961
Academic Prizes
Dr R Macdonald Prize for 1st in class 2H:      Lorraine McPherson
Star Motel Prize for 2nd in class 2H:               Cecily Smallwood
Cox Bros Prize for 3rd in class 2H:                  Brian Burnett
Dr F C Yarad Prize for 1st in class 2G:           Merle Herring
J Wheaton Prize for 2nd in class 2G:               Marilyn Alaban
Cox Bros Prize for 3rd in class 2G:                  Kaye Mulligan
Star Motel Prize for 1st in class 2F:                Kerrie Gillard
Cox Bros Prize for 2nd in class 2F:                  Sandra Waples
Cox Bros Prize for 3rd in class 2F:                  Roy Hoffmeier
A C Hogbin Prize for 1st in class 2E:              Anita Spagnola
AE Hacking Prize for 2nd in class 2E:             Daphne Beelitz
F W Small Prize for 3rd in class 2E:                Margaret Murray
N Bale Prize for 1st in class 2D:                      Richard O’Toole
S Haworth Prize for 2nd in class 2D:               Beth Hunter
E Thompson Prize for 3rd in class 2D: Patricia Turk
GW & RA Loader Prize for 1st in class 2C:   Delma Walters
Dr F C Yarad Prize for 2nd in class 2C:         Cristine Wheaton
GW & RA Loader Prize for 3rd in class 2C:   Jill Hoschke & Robyn King
J Turner Prize for 1st in class 2B:                    Dawn Eckford
M Smith Prize for 2nd in class 2B:                   Jan Ross
M Smith Prize for 3rd in class 2B:                   Beverley O’Neill
Apex Prize for Dux of 2nd Year:                     James Holmes
GDT. Seccombe & Forsyth Prize for 2nd in class 2A: Gail Quin
Pacific Plywood Prize for 3rd in class 2A:                              John Samio
Special Prizes
Academic and for Proficiency
P & C Prize for Best Leaving Certificate Pass, 1960:            Bronwyn Phillips
JH Brown Prize for English Language & Literature: Helen Corben
Dr Hawke Prize for:
  1. Senior French, Jeanette Whitney
  2. Junior French, John Curran
JC Prize for Progress in Effective Speaking:  Barry O’Brien (4th Year)
Sawtell RSL Women’s Auxiliary Prize for Progress:
            Senior Girl, Adele Toms;  Senior Boy, John Landale
            Junior Girl, Margaret Murray (2E);  Junior Boy, Graham Knight (1B)
CWA Prize for Home Economics:      Shirley Neal (3B)
Cadet Prize for Proficiency & Leadership:     Dennis Lee
Coffs Harbour District Council of the BGF Prize for Agriculture:
            Theoretical Agriculture, Robert Howard (3C), Ray Gale (3F), Robert Griffin (2C),
            Bruce Young (2H), Brian Sisson (2G), John Glyde (1C), David Scully (1C)
            Practical Agriculture, Robert Wallis (3F), Wayne W Smith (2C), Robert McKay (2H),
            Alan Turnbull (2G), Peter Rovere (1C), Orlando Del Pozzo (1E), Ian Lambert (1F)
JC Debating Shield for inter-house competition:  Won by Red House
Presented to Diane Loader, a member of winning senior team
 
House Officials, 1962
Girls
White House:  Lynn Robinson (capt), Heather Watt (secretary)
Green House:  Annette Johnson (capt), Kay Fisher (secretary)
Red House:                 Dianne Loade (capt), Margaret Morrow (secretary)
Blue House:                Heather Eckford (capt), Maureen Aldridge (secretary)
Boys
White House:              Douglas Sykes (capt), Warwick Smith (vice-capt)
Green House:              Richard Hancock (capt), Barry Foster (vice-capt)
Red House:                 Denis Lee (capt), David Llewellyn (vice-capt)
Blue House:                Hugh Crawford (capt), Graham Carter (vice-capt)
Sports Awards, 1962
Sportswoman of the Year:      Delma Walters
Sportsman of the Year:           Barry Foster
Blue Award
Awarded for outstanding ability, sportsmanship, leadership & co-operation
Girls                Hockey:           K Fisher
                        Athletics:         D Walters, R Schumacher
Boys                Cricket:           K Sparks, D Lyall
                        Football:          D Llewellyn, G Williams, G Carter, B Foster, T McNally
                        Athletics:         B Foster, A Young, G Williams
                        Basketball:      G Williams, D Llewellyn
Sports Award of Merit
This award is presented to those who just fail to reach the very high standard demanded of a Blue winner
Girls                Basketball:      F Robinson, J Grey
                        Softball:          K Fisher, D Walters, J Oxford
                        Swimming:      J Hoschke, H Watt
Boys                Cricket:           R Haworth
                        Football:          A Hope, K Sparks, M Nolan, R Barber
                        Tennis:             J Williams, C Ford
                        Athletics:         H Crawford
                        Basketball:      A Young, B Foster, D Sykes, L Pigani
                        Swimming:      D Sykes
Athletic Champions
Senior:             B Foster, R Schumacher
Intermediate:   C McInnes, E Bagnara, G Dean
Junior:             D Johnston, L Rovere
Juvenile:          J Smith, C Waite, S Shipman
Swimming Champions         
Senior:             D Sykes, H Watt
Intermediate:   J Jones, J Hoschke
Junior:             W Browning, G Cleaver
Juvenile:          M Glynn, C Turner
 
Literary Section – 1962
Ode to Shakespeare
Oh’ Shakespeare, why, as your flowery words,
Thou didst pen upon the page.
Didst thou not spare a thought to me,
In this far distant age.
Didst thou n’er once think, of the pain and woe,
Of my miseries beset,
E’re I ventured from your plays and verse,
Some meaning for to get.
And didst thou think long aft’ the grave
Had closed upon your head.
That we would keep each word that thou,
Had penned or jesting said.
For me dost think that in this day,
Of learning, alas, alack.
The thoughts that I read in your words,
Are mine, not thine in fact.
                                                P Freeman, 3A
 
 
The Beacon 1963
Prize List – Third Year
3G          Dr Dolman prize, 1st in 3G:                            Merle Herring.
                Mr and Mrs Fred Reid prize, 2nd in 3G:    Sally Jones.
                L Judd prize, 3rd in 3G:                                    Marilyn Alaban.
3F           M Smith prize, 1st in 3F:                                 Fred Skinner.
                Pacific Plywood prize, 2nd in 3F:                  Roy Hofmeier.
                BL Miller prize, 3rd in 3F:                                                Brian Stephenson, Norina Spagnola.
3E           SE Nelson prize, 1st in 3E:                              Esther Trustum.
                J Corney prize, 2nd in 3E:                                                Gilbert Stokes.
                SE Nelson prize, 3rd in 3E:                              Anita Spagnola.
3D           Pacific Plywood prize, 1st in 3D:                  Patricia Turk.
                A Gilchrist prize, 2nd in 3D:                            Beth Hunter.
                L Judd prize, 3rd in 3D:                                    Fay Philp.
3C           D Appleton prize, 1st in 3C:                           Christine Wheaton.
                L Kesterton prize, 2nd in 3C:                          Robyn King.
                Pier Hotel prize, 3rd in 3C:                             Delma Walters.
3B           A Smith and Son prize, 1st in 3B:                 Gregory Ferris.
                Star Motel prize, 2nd in 3B:                            Larry Griffin.
                A Smith and Son prize, 3rd in 3B:                                Ian Shepherd.
3A           Rotary prize, dux of 3rd year:                       Merita Quin.
                WH Bailey prize, 2nd in 3A:                            James Holmes.
                RG Riddel prize, 3rd in 3A:                             Joyce Wear.
House Officials, 1963
Girls                     
White House:    Heather Watt (captain), Delma Walters (vice-captain).
Green House:    Julia Featherstone (captain), Jill Hoschke (vice-captain).
Red House:         Hilary Nicholson (captain), Margaret Morrow (vice-captain).
Blue House:        Maureen Aldridge (captain), Maree Cutcher (vice-captain).
Boys
White House:    Douglas Sykes (captain), Keith Sparks (vice-captain).
Green House:    Barry Foster (captain), Andrew Hogendyk (vice-captain).
Red House:         Peter Moller (captain), Carl McPhee (vice-captain).
Blue House:        Graham Carter (captain), Robert Cowin (vice-captain).
Sports Awards, 1963
Sportswoman of the Year:           Delma Walters.
Sportman of the Year:                   Douglas Sykes.
Blue Awards
Awarded for outstanding ability, sportsmanship, leadership and co-operation.
Girls
Swimming:          J Hoschke.
Hockey:                                J Feathersone, L Robinson.
Softball:               J Hoschke.
Basketball:          V Lucas.
Boys
Cricket:                 K Sparks.
Football:              B Foster, G Carter, K Sparks, R Cowin.
Athletics:             D Sykes.
Basketball:          L Lee, B Foster.
Swimming:          D Sykes.
Sports Awards of Merit
This award is presented to those who just fail to reach the very high standard demanded of a Blue winner.
Girls
Basketball:          M Morrow, D Walters.
Softball:               S Neal.
Tennis:                 M Aldrige, K Wear, S Neal.
Hockey:                                S Thompson, H Nicholson.
Boys
Cricket:                 R Cowin.
Football:              I Donaldson, D Johnstone, J Martin.
Tennis:                 R Gawne.
Athletics:             B Foster.
Basketball:          D Sykes, L Pigani.
LITERARY SECTION
 
How To Succeed In Rugby League Without Really Trying
   From my past observations, I have found that the easiest position to play in Rugby League is fullback.  On reading this you will probably wonder why more people do not play fullback.  However, there is one regulation – fullbacks must be good looking.  It’s no use protesting, you cannot be a fullback unless you rate sighs from at least three girls.  The most glamorous boys in the business play fullbacks – Les Johns, Ken Thornett, Frank Drake and Graeme Langlands, to name just a few.
   Since fullback is one of the most important defence positions you must not play in a team which is always on defence.  Pick one of the best teams which is usually on the attack so that you will not have to defend continually.
   Now that you are ready to play you must decide what type of fullback you will be.  There are two types, attacking or goal-kicking.
   If you have no hope at all of every kicking a goal it will be best if you become an attacking fullback.  This consists of standing back quietly while your team is on the attack, clearing its way to the try line.  When the way is clear, with everyone too exhausted to take the ball and score you step up, take the ball, and casually saunter over the try line.  After doing this a few times, you will convince the team that you are indispensible and you will be right for the remainder of your Rugby League career.
   On the other hand, if you are convinced that you are a respectable goal kicker you can become a goal-kicking fullback.  This consists of remaining down your end of the field except when converting tries or kicking penalty goals (it is advisable to take your favourite periodical onto the field as play tends to become boring at times).  If you kick well enough you will become a necessary member of the team, assured of selection in future matches.
   No matter how carefully he withdraws himself from the main battle, every fullback faces a crisis at some stage in his career.  Despite the strength of your team, it will eventually meet a team which manages to penetrate the defence, leaving you the sole defender of your team’s line.  This is the moment of truth for every fullback.  You can stop the player with a bone-shattering tackle, or miss, damaging forever your so carefully built up reputation of indispensability.
   If you manage to achieve the first alternative you will, of course, receive immediate and vociferous acclaim, which will be very pleasant no doubt at the time.  But – and here’s the rub – you will have created a very dangerous precedent.  People will expect you to pull off the same sort of thing again, and again, and again, which will not only be extremely exhausting (not to say down-right dangerous), but will inevitably lead to your taking over the team’s defence almost entirely.  This, of course, is not to be thought of – no player plays football for the love of hard work.
   The second alternative, missing the player entirely, is much to be preferred.  This can be achieved – if approached in the right spirit – with very little loss of prestige.  One way is to start a fierce altercation with the nearest player, or preferably the referee, as soon as you spot the attacker bearing down upon you.  If your acting is good enough the public will easily be convinced that your grievance was serious enough for a temporary suspension of play, even at a critical moment in the game.
   Alternatively, you could rush towards the attacker and fling yourself headlong at his legs in a classical tackle, making quite sure that you miss your target by narrow but safe margin.  You will a least receive commiseration for a valiant, even though vain, bid and perhaps even admiration for your stylish play.
   Again, you can start forward with every evidence of a do-or-die resolve, suddenly to pull up lame, or even to crumple in a dead faint.  This last method, if done effectively, always gains the sympathy of even the most partisan crowd, and your reputation will be safe – till the next time.
                                                                Merita Quin, 4A
To My Golf Ball
I sit up, I take a swing, and look up to the sky,
But do I see it sailing down?  No, even though I try.
It’s lying quietly in that bush, not far away from me.
Now how to hit it to the hole.  I really cannot see.
So once more I line it up, determined that this time
I’ll hit it straight.  It will not err from my decided line.
Ker-smash?  It  sounded rather good, now where did that thing go?
Why, there it is, still lying there, right beside my toe.
This time, I murmured to myself, I’ll it there in one.
But where’d it go – I cannot see – I’m blinded by the sun.
Oh!  There it is, just in the drain, there’s one thing I must sy,
I’ll never lose that ball because it’s never far away.
                                                Beverley Amos, 4A
 
 
 
The Beacon
1964
Fourth Year
P & C prize, Dux of Fourth Year:                    Merita Quin
Dr CH Wood prize, second Fourth Year:                     James Holmes
Cox Bros price, third Fourth Year:                   John Samio
H Bailey prize, fourth Fourth Year:                 Douglas Turner
GDT Seccombe prize, fifth Fourth Year:                     Brett Griffin
Special Prizes
P & C prize, best LC Pass, 1962:         Susan Walker
JH Brown, MLA prize, English language & literature: Terrance Hancock
W Weiley, MLA prize, Science (junior) Peter Slack
Dr David Hawke Memorial prize, French:       Senior, Margaret Morrow, Julia Featherstone;  Peter Walker
CWA prize, home economics:             Ella Gabauer
Cadet prize, proficiency & leadership:            Richard O’Toole
Sawtell RSL Sub-Branch Women’s Auxiliary prize, progress: Senior girl, Lyndall Ashdown; senior boy, Geoffrey Herdegen;  junior girl, Janice Hardaker;  junior boy, Paul Bamford
JC Prize, debating & public speaking:  Martin McFaalane
Coffs Harbour District Council BGF Prizes for Agriculture
Fifth Year:  John Ellem:  Fourth Year:  Ronald Gray;  Third Year:  Peter Rovere, Richard Buckton;  Second Year:  Peter McKenzie, Stuart Rowlands, Denis McLaren, Neville McKay
Conti School Supplies prize, technical drawing:  Leonard Skinner
House Captains – Vice-Captains, 1964
Girls
Blue House:                 Captain, L Dornan, 4D;  vice-captain, P Fisher 4A
Green House:               Captain, E Gabauer, 4th;  vice-captain, D Gawne, 5th
Red House:                  Captain, J Ross, B Ovens, 5th;  vice-captain, B Noyce, 5th
White House:               Captain, D Walters, 4C;  vice-captain, J Ross,5th
Boys
Blue:    Captain, R Cowan, 5B;  vice-catpain, T Brown, 4D
Green:  Captain, G Gerlach, 5A;  vice-captain, D Hammond, 5B
Red:     Captain, P Moller, 5C;  vice-captain, C McPhee, 5A
White:  Captain, D Sykes, 5C;  vice-captain, J Rose, 5B
Awards of Merit
Awarded to those who just fail to attain the very high standard demanded of a Blue winner.
Girls
Tennis:                         D Tom, J Wear
Softball:                       L Dornan, D Walters, L Rovere, P Fisher, D Amos
Basketball:                   B Ovens, M Finch, J Ross, C Wheaton
Athletics:                     L Durie, S Shipman, C Walters, J Lamberth
Hockey:                       P Fisher, L Rovere, S Grimmond, S Robinson
Boys
Tennis:                         M McDonald, P Young, J Muldoon
Football:                      J Rose, L Griffin, P Reeves, I Rogers, R Cowin, D Johnston
Basketball:                   P Ireland, C Gill, G Gerlach
Cricket:                                    J Rose, R Cowin, J Muldoon
Athletics:                     C Knight, J Hill, J Ide, J Rose, P McDonald, D Turner, J Haines
Sports Awards, 1964
Sportswoman of the Year:       Delma Walters, 4C
Sportsman of the Year:                        John Rose, 5B
Blue Awards
Awarded for outstanding ability, sportsmanship, leadership and co-operation
Girls
Softball:                       J Ross
Basketball:                   D Walters, L Durie
Athletics:                     D Walters
Boys
Athletics:                     D Sykes
Tennis:                         R Gawne
Athletic Champions
Senior:                         D Walters, D Sykes
Intermediate:                S Shipman, C Knight
Junior:                         L Durie, J Hill
Juvenile:                      C Walters, J Ide
 
Literary Section
Shipwreck
(Allusion to Rime of Ancient Mariner)
The east wind shrilled as the sea-foam flew
And whistled round the crags;
And the salt spray sang and the caverns clanged,
And the ebbing water flagged
From our stately galleon tossed about
On the grey and rolling sea;
We could hear the roar on the rock-strewn shore
As the waves crashed mightily
 
The sea was rough and the surge rose high,
The wind blew fierce and strong;
A powerful blast caught the rails at last,
And the ship was hurled along
 
As wild winds whipped on the white-whirled surf
Swifter the good ship sped;
And the salt spray lashed and the huge waves crashed
On the bare black rocks ahead
 
Through the seething foam and stinging brine
Our ship did reckless plough;
Till the sudden shock of a sunken rock
Split its hull from stem to bow
 
The ship sat locked on the jagged rock
As we cut the life-boats free,
And ‘mid the frenzied din we all leaped in
And pushed them out to sea
 
We made for shore in our bobbing boats
And beached them finally,
But our ship, snatched up in deathlike clutch,
Was claimed by the cruel sea.
Wayne Buckman, 5A
Winter
            Winter had left an icy carpet over the city.  The snow, which had fallen like a soft, white powder, covered the streets in a silvery mantle.  Sparkling white particles of frozen frost clung to the windows and roofs of the houses;  and in the parks, the branches of the stark, windblown trees wore a delicate tracery of glistening snow.
Wayne Buckman, 5A
Slum Land
            Past the expressways striding across the city on their giant legs of concrete;  beyond the towering skyscrapers which dominate the evening skyline;  and behind the sparkling facade of neon signs that light up the downtown area, lies a tangle of narrow. twisting lanes and shabby streets.  Houses, shops and factories huddle together in a grimy confusion of chipped and crumbling brickwork.  Yes!  This is a slum land;  an area whose dirty, sooty and dilapidated buildings present the same grim picture of neglect and decay.  This is a district where the same dwellings have remained unchanged for generations, and where the traditional sluggishness of the inhabitants has built up a barrier that has stood unyielding to resist the winds of change.
Wayne Buckman, 5A
The Teacher
Teacher, teacher, spitting fumes
Within the walls that form our rooms,
What immortal hand or eye
Did frame thy hidden history.
 
Though I try to do my work,
And my duties not to shirk,
What reward do I receive?
What shims of yours must I Perceive?
 
Could you not a kind work spare
To say just once my work is fair;
From your fury turn a while,
Reveal instead a friendly smile.
 
In what college, in what art
Did you exchange a stone for heart?
Where the patience, hear my plea
Did he who make the lamb, make thee?
Bev Amos
With apologies to William Blake